stephen falk


I am Stephen Falk, a Los Angeles-based writer and producer for television and movies. I created a show called "You're The Worst," premiering in JULY 2014 on FX. Previously, I worked on "Orange Is The New Black" and Showtime's "Weeds." And was the creator of this show, the process of which I wrote about in an infamous post. Even though I throw my hands in the air and wave them like I just don't care. I do care. Very, very much.\\

if you want to ask me a question, do it here!

Or go to my main website stephenfalk.com.


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Posted 6 days ago on April 17 2014


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popculturebrain:

New Trailer: ‘Orange Is the New Black' Season 2 - June 6


Posted 1 week ago on April 16 2014


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Posted:
1 week ago on April 16 2014

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(Source: keithtalent)



Posted 1 week ago on April 15 2014


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Film Pigs on GeekNation Show #87: Gutting Pigs!
The Film Pigs finally get their own aftershow discussing this week’s show, right after the show. It doesn’t go well.
Watch it here.

Film Pigs on GeekNation Show #87: Gutting Pigs!

The Film Pigs finally get their own aftershow discussing this week’s show, right after the show. It doesn’t go well.

Watch it here.



Posted 1 week ago on April 13 2014


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(Source: sfgiants)



Posted 1 week ago on April 11 2014


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Summertime!


Posted 2 weeks ago on April 7 2014


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natashavc:

Your Public School theme: THE FIRST, LAST OR ONLY TIME!
This Tuesday, April 8th, these lumps of talent will GET REAL WITH YOU (ABOUT SHIT THEY DID AND PROBABLY DON’T WANT TO DO AGAIN OR DID IT ONCE AND ARE STILL CHASING THAT HIGH MAYBE A VIRGINITY STORY WHO KNOWS ITS PUBLIC SCHOOL!):
Colton Dunn * Michelle Collins *Adam Spiegleman * Laura Krafft * Josh Flaum *Ryan Raddatz * Leilani Zee * Christian Brown * Hosted by Joey “The Gatekeeper” Slamon  
RSVP now in the name of good taste.
Emotionally rendered art by the astronomical Tully Mills. 

natashavc:

Your Public School theme: THE FIRST, LAST OR ONLY TIME!

This Tuesday, April 8th, these lumps of talent will GET REAL WITH YOU (ABOUT SHIT THEY DID AND PROBABLY DON’T WANT TO DO AGAIN OR DID IT ONCE AND ARE STILL CHASING THAT HIGH MAYBE A VIRGINITY STORY WHO KNOWS ITS PUBLIC SCHOOL!):

Colton Dunn * Michelle Collins *Adam Spiegleman * Laura Krafft Josh Flaum *Ryan Raddatz * Leilani Zee * Christian Brown * Hosted by Joey “The Gatekeeper” Slamon  

RSVP now in the name of good taste.

Emotionally rendered art by the astronomical Tully Mills. 



Posted 2 weeks ago on April 3 2014


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nprfreshair:

Congratulations to the winners of the 2013 Peabody Awards! 
The list includes Orange is the New Black, Key & Peele,The Bridge,  The Race Card Project, and our friends at This American Life. 
Two of our most talked about interviews of last year were with “the real Piper,” Piper Kerman, and Orange is the New Black show creator Jenji Kohan. 
Other interviews with Peabody winners include Keegan-Michael Key and Jordan Peele of Key & Peele and the star of The Bridge, Demian Bichir.
We’ve also got reviews of Borgen and Six By Sondheim!

Peabody!

nprfreshair:

Congratulations to the winners of the 2013 Peabody Awards

The list includes Orange is the New Black, Key & Peele,The Bridge,  The Race Card Project, and our friends at This American Life

Two of our most talked about interviews of last year were with “the real Piper,” Piper Kerman, and Orange is the New Black show creator Jenji Kohan

Other interviews with Peabody winners include Keegan-Michael Key and Jordan Peele of Key & Peele and the star of The Bridge, Demian Bichir.

We’ve also got reviews of Borgen and Six By Sondheim!

Peabody!



Posted 3 weeks ago on March 27 2014


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mylesmcnutt:

I woke up to a text from my brother: “RIPTWOP.”
The loss of Television Without Pity is a difficult one, although not because it interrupts my daily routine: it’s been years since I’ve visited the site regularly, and probably at least a year since I clicked over to any of its coverage or visited its forums (which I haven’t logged into in probably four years or so).
It’s difficult instead for two different reasons. On the one hand, it’s difficult because of the sheer volume of content that will be lost when the site shuts its doors. It has lived on as an archive of week-by-week engagement with television programming, both in its recaps and—especially—in its forums. From a scholarly perspective, this archive has been both a subject of study in and of itself and a space in which other subjects can be studied (I last used the forums to study audience response to dynamics of race in Showtime’s Weeds during its early seasons, for example). The idea that this archive could be lost (to the public, since NBC Universal has announced they’re archiving it but not for public access) is rightfully a point of concern among the site and its followers, and consider this brief overview my commitment to helping with any archival efforts.
However, the other reason the site’s death is so resonant is because its influence spreads so far beyond its content, both in terms of the careers its creators and writers have gone on to have, and the way it has influenced its readers and commenters—that’s me, in this instance—to engage with television in an in-depth way. For as much as the loss of the site’s content is hard to imagine, it’s even more difficult to imagine a world when that content hadn’t existed. Despite largely being marginalized from contemporary television discourse in the post-Bravo acquisition era, the site’s legacy has lived on in ways that make even the death of the post-Bravo Television Without Pity into a meaningful event for reasons beyond the loss of the content itself.
There is no question that Television Without Pity was a substantial influence in how I engage with television, fostering an engagement with the medium that would bleed into my academic work, frame my early days blogging about television, and eventually exist as a foundation for whatever my academic/critical identities have become. I will always hold at least a bit of a—fake—grudge against the site for popularizing the term “Recap” that has become unnecessarily ubiquitous in thinking about episodic television coverage, but at the end of the day Television Without Pity had an immeasurable impact on a generation of readers that have today taken to social media to reflect on its impact.
The site is shutting down because of how many of those remembrances are in the past tense; the site’s legacy will live on because of how many remembrances there are.

I don’t know how many scores of words of recaps I have on the site that will disappear, but it’s a lot. Thank you, TWOP. Good night, sweet Tubey.

mylesmcnutt:

I woke up to a text from my brother: “RIPTWOP.”

The loss of Television Without Pity is a difficult one, although not because it interrupts my daily routine: it’s been years since I’ve visited the site regularly, and probably at least a year since I clicked over to any of its coverage or visited its forums (which I haven’t logged into in probably four years or so).

It’s difficult instead for two different reasons. On the one hand, it’s difficult because of the sheer volume of content that will be lost when the site shuts its doors. It has lived on as an archive of week-by-week engagement with television programming, both in its recaps and—especially—in its forums. From a scholarly perspective, this archive has been both a subject of study in and of itself and a space in which other subjects can be studied (I last used the forums to study audience response to dynamics of race in Showtime’s Weeds during its early seasons, for example). The idea that this archive could be lost (to the public, since NBC Universal has announced they’re archiving it but not for public access) is rightfully a point of concern among the site and its followers, and consider this brief overview my commitment to helping with any archival efforts.

However, the other reason the site’s death is so resonant is because its influence spreads so far beyond its content, both in terms of the careers its creators and writers have gone on to have, and the way it has influenced its readers and commenters—that’s me, in this instance—to engage with television in an in-depth way. For as much as the loss of the site’s content is hard to imagine, it’s even more difficult to imagine a world when that content hadn’t existed. Despite largely being marginalized from contemporary television discourse in the post-Bravo acquisition era, the site’s legacy has lived on in ways that make even the death of the post-Bravo Television Without Pity into a meaningful event for reasons beyond the loss of the content itself.

There is no question that Television Without Pity was a substantial influence in how I engage with television, fostering an engagement with the medium that would bleed into my academic work, frame my early days blogging about television, and eventually exist as a foundation for whatever my academic/critical identities have become. I will always hold at least a bit of a—fake—grudge against the site for popularizing the term “Recap” that has become unnecessarily ubiquitous in thinking about episodic television coverage, but at the end of the day Television Without Pity had an immeasurable impact on a generation of readers that have today taken to social media to reflect on its impact.

The site is shutting down because of how many of those remembrances are in the past tense; the site’s legacy will live on because of how many remembrances there are.

I don’t know how many scores of words of recaps I have on the site that will disappear, but it’s a lot. Thank you, TWOP. Good night, sweet Tubey.

(via popculturebrain)



Posted 4 weeks ago on March 26 2014


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(Source: monsteround, via danforth)


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